The Breeders by Matthew J. Beier

The Breeders by Matthew J. Beier

The Breeders by Matthew J. Beier

Publisher: Epicality Books
Release: 2012
Image Source: The Author

Synopsis: THE STORM HAS COME. 

The homosexuals, once an ostracized social minority, have taken over the world. They understand the angers of an overpopulated planet, usurped government power, and created a culture of perfectly engineered families. But Grace Jarvis and Dex Wheelock are heterosexuals—part of the government’s highly controlled backup plan for reproduction—and they have a problem.

Grace is pregnant. Dex is the father. It is a crime that has only one consequence: banishment to the Antarctic Sanctuary, an isolated biological reserve where reproductive criminals are allowed to exist in peace, without disrupting the rest of civilization. Yet there are rumors that genocide has already begun and that the homosexuals are finally setting natural breeders on a path to extinction. This leaves Grace and Dex with only two choices: to succumb to the tyrannical regime, or run. 

THEY CHOOSE TO RUN.

Review: The Breeders by Matthew J. Beier is a heart wrenching story of love and hope. The author manages to weave an intimate tale of lovers while making a vast foray into controversial social issues and life values. Published in 2012, The Breeders has the potential to become a modern classic. Within its pages lies discovery and realization on an unprecedented level, one that could strongly impact culture and make one think twice about the fundamental values of being human.

As a dystopian thriller, The Breeders takes place in the late twenty-third century. Technology has advanced, if not quite as extremely as one would expect. Society has shifted dramatically and not necessarily for the better. The world has finally recovered from the “Bio Wars,” which almost brought about the total extinction of humanity. The remaining population is considerably smaller and dictated by a highly conservative regime of sexual politics. A world government retains almost absolute control, even placing restrictions on the natural birthing process. Even more shocking is the fact that homosexuality is the new norm. Heterosexuals have become a minority and are in a constant and accelerating state of degradation.

Matthew J. Beier has concocted a tale of masterful proportions. His goal in writing The Breeders was to provide a different perspective to the intense debate over gay marriage. What is generally considered normal in our society has been reversed, only to provide insight for issues our nation is currently undergoing. Beier found inspiration in the 2008 ad campaign for the National Organization for Marriage, which likened gay marriage to “a coming storm.” His vision is to give people the opportunity to “step into the shoes of those they are speaking out against.”

The Breeders has captured the beauty of two individuals trying to find value in a world where their kind must endure the condemnation of society. Solace cannot even be found with friends or family who struggle to hide their blatant disapproval. The mere act of producing a child via unplanned and natural reproduction has become taboo in this backwards world. The protagonists must face their own insecurities if they ever hope to find peace at the end of the road. The storyline was one of those that actually made you stop thinking and feel your way through the novel. Understanding the motives behind Beier’s characters can only be done by stepping into their very shoes and feeling for yourself why they made certain decisions and chose particular paths. The humanity in his words was refreshing, almost reminiscent of Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games. While reading, I felt the pain of Dex Wheelock as he struggled with the fear of taking responsibility for his own child, and I could almost taste the tears of Grace Jarvis when she realized she may never see her beloved father again. This is the kind of book that makes one realize how wonderful and terrible it is to be human. This is the kind of book that bridges the gap between sorrow and joy.

Throughout the novel, readers will began to recognize the plot as an exaggerated reverse-scenario of our own society. In the world of The Breeders, intolerance toward heterosexuals is rampant. In our own world, the exact opposite is occurring. Hate crimes against gays and lesbians happen every day. The LGBT community is constantly under attack for being ‘unnatural’ and ‘sinful.’ This ideology is based on the literal interpretation of scripture, dogma, and an outdated viewpoint of humanity. It’s a simple and sad fact that people are willing to condemn others for falling in love with someone of the same gender. I question any authority that justifies limiting the definition of love. This is a fundamental gift all humans can partake in, one that is all-inclusive. Gender and other worldly characteristics cannot inhibit the pure and relentless power of affection. I am confident that Matthew Beier will share this wisdom with the populace and stand by his dream to help people see that humanity is “only as strong as it is united and as weak as it is divided.”

While reading, I also stepped into the shoes of its author and began to understand the impact his life experiences have had on his integrity. Living in a society where being honest about yourself leads to prejudice and disdain is a carving experience. It whittles out a character like no other. Something truly remarkable about a book is its ability the capture the soul of the author. The Breeders has done this and more. The character of Beier is evident in every sentence: his passion, hope, and even a bit of fear. Matthew Beier is truly an exceptional individual, one who understands the difficulties of living in a largely intolerant society. I sympathize with him and know from what direction he speaks from. To find the willingness to reconcile with those who are opposed to his orientation is a courageous action. I can only hope to channel this courage when facing life difficulties of my own.

Even though The Breeders ended (spoiler alert) on an incredibly dismal note, Beier was able to implement a sense of hope into the reader’s experience. As the protagonists Dex and Grace were deceived by the very people they thought were helping them, the novel begins to show its true spiritual colors. Left to die in the frozen and apparently uninhabited wasteland of Antarctica, the couple with their infant child realize how futile their efforts have been to evade government. Everything the reader hoped for seems to be lost, and one may even end up hating the novel because of it. The author intended to write the end as emotionally honest as possible, which proves his persevering integrity. This was his intention, yet Beier could also not devise the ending to be entirely hopeless. By the fleeting glimpse of a rainbow, Dex departed life with God’s promise that life would go on. The story ended with a sobering and eye opening enlightenment. The empowering and stunning realization of The Breeders is revealed, and readers are instilled with hope that even the “worst of life may merely be a prelude for what is to come.” It was the perfect ending, one that speaks of life’s gift and the great mystery afterwards.

The Breeders is one of the most heartfelt books I have read. There is sincere passion and inspiration between its covers. It’s one of those incredible works of literature everybody should read once in their lifetime, even if they disagree with what the author advocates. It definitely provides an enlightening perspective, and together with refreshing characters, a strong storyline, and superb writing, grants for a truly gripping read. It is my strong desire to see literary works like The Breeders impact society for the better. Intolerance only breeds conflict and creates a rift in our nation. If humanity is to rise above and meet new, more problematic difficulties head-on, we must realize how impeding our petty quarrels truly are. Denying rights for homosexual couples, including marriage, is a mindset that causes harm and threatens to derail any sort of political compromise. Personally, I can say that it hurts. Being unable to express your feelings for someone you love is heartbreaking and depressing. I severely hope that ‘traditional marriage’ advocates will someday understand the pain they inflict upon homosexuals who are otherwise no different from themselves.

There is a bigger picture to life than trying to oppose the suffering we all endure. We can let it tear our hearts and minds apart, but we can also realize that it is a gift in itself: the opportunity to learn from our mistakes, grow because of our hardships, and appreciate the occasional moments of awe that comprise the foundation of spiritual experience. When death finally rolls along, we can depart reveling in the knowledge that life goes on, and what lies ahead is the ultimate mystery. I thank Matthew J. Beier for making this review possible and for unknowingly handing me the answer to a long-standing dilemma. All in all, I recommend this novel to readers who are not afraid to open their eyes. I recommend The Breeders to the ones who need it most: the hopeless, the inhibited, and the downtrodden. For all of those who need to hear it, this book has a message that rings loud and clear: It gets better.

Beier, Matthew J. (2012) The Breeders. United States: Epicality Books

Is Our Constitution Still Relevant?


“There is nothing permanent in life except change,” said philosopher Heraclitus. The nature of the universe is relative in every regard, and infinity is only a concept that can be applied to the ever-evolving nature of the cosmos. This notion applies to many facets of life, including civilization and society. It even applies to humanity, which has always undergone a gradual, yet profound social change.  

Government has always been vital as the backbone of human coexistence. Finding the perfect means to instill order in the population has been the goal of countless leaders. One prime example is the United States Constitution, a 225 year-old document that comprises the founding principles of one of the greatest democracies in history. Enacted in 1789, it still persists as one of the oldest written constitutions still in use. 

Some argue whether such a time-honored document, originally constructed over 200 years ago, is still relevant in today’s society. Although numerous amendments have been made—and the possibility of more arising is a likelihood—some still argue whether the American people can continue to coexist under a patchwork quilt of quick fixes. Indeed, the founding principles of our government still stand strong. It is not the root of the Constitution that has become outdated; it is the unchecked and wild growth of its many amendments that lead this epitome of freedom into increasing obscurity.

I firmly acknowledge the importance of the 27 amendments and their many essential revisions. I merely fear that they have not correlated with the social change in our nation, as they should. The Constitution of the United States established a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people,” which was also expressed in the Declaration of Independence. This system was based on balance and attempted to involve citizens with government on an unprecedented scale. If our constitution is altered or amended without the the consent of the people, then a grievous blow has been struck to our nation’s fundamental values. 

The original intent of the Founding Fathers was to instill social harmony between government and population. Therefore, the Constitution must always—with no exceptions—reflect the mind of the people. This must be accomplished while still keeping the original integrity of the Founding Fathers intact. To accurately reflect the mind of the people, the Constitution must be open to change; it must continually adapt to the prevailing social outlook of society. 

It is human nature to overlook change, especially social reform. If the United States Constitution is to remain relevant, the government should accept that society is fluid and always changing. Ideology should not be immortalized within the Constitution. Besides the rights and freedoms that were endowed to us at the time of the Founders, any ideology should be frequently amended to portray the mind of the people. The integrity of the Founding Fathers should be respected and adapted as society’s needs evolve. Ensuring the evolutionary capabilities of the Constitution also ensures that original intent is upheld. The 27 Amendments have aided our government in modernizing its social policies, yet these ‘patches’ are only quick fixes. One step further should be taken to completely rebuild our founding document as an accurate portrayal of the American people.

Change is not a force to be feared, but embraced. According to Matthew 9:17 of the New Testament, “Neither do people pour wine into old wineskins. If they do, the skins will burst; the wine will run out and the wineskins will be ruined. No, they pour new wine into new wineskins, and both are preserved.” The world is in a constant and never-ending state of change. Nothing is permanent and everything eventually passes with time, including ideals. This is frightening to humans; the fact that our very thoughts, memories, and life will fade with time. Humans try to conform the world to their individual visions and immortalize the ideals they enforce upon others. The creation of government is a prime example of this situation. What every human fails to realize is that events will never pan out exactly as expected and will never remain permanent. This is the beauty of evolution, of change. The only foolproof way of ensuring a peaceful correlation between government and the people is by constructing a constitution that instills this beauty. 

The Founding Fathers did not just intend to create a constitution that suited their time and era. They recognized societal evolution as something vital to the future of our nation and, in turn, created an amendable document to dictate the law of the land. But our Founders cannot ensure the modernity of the Constitution from their graves. Their words are not strong enough to secure the legacy of their original intent. As mentioned, nothing lasts forever, including ideals. It is the job of newer generations to secure the relevance of the Constitution. They are the fore-bearers of change and future reforms. Only the people of today can determine the social values of our civilization and our culture.   

Our constitution is still relevant, but only just. Pressure from various advocates across the nation are calling for social reform of various scales. If a failure to heed the calls of citizens ensues, the Constitution of the United States of America will become close to dangerously outdated. We will find its irrelevance increasingly pronounced. This is my message to anyone with enough backbone to question precept: You have the right to dictate what is right or wrong. Inspiration can arise from our history, but only our hearts can truly determine what is best for modern society. This knowledge comes only by doing, not by the study of those who have already done. Our goal in life is to become trailblazers, and to forge ahead with our own modern ideals. So be a freethinker, and be original. Think for yourself and accept that times change. What was right for society 225 years ago may not be appropriate for today. I think the ultimate realization in life is when change is finally understood, and a modern generation is able to rise and follow their own hearts, not the heart of doctrine and creed.    

Image courtesy of http://www.teaparty911.com/blog/a-tenth-amendment-constitutional-crisis/